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Danish Center for Computational Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Atmospheric Turbulence

Sites

SITE : calwind

CLASSIFICATION:	hill(rolling hills), scrub(bushes and small trees)
COUNTRY 	  	:	US
ALTITUDE 	  	:	1463 [m]
POSITION  	:	35�3'13'' N 118�22'33'' W (site reference)

(Note: Geohack often includes national high resolution maps, otherwise try Google Earth)

ACKOWLEDGEMENT 	:	
Sandy Butterfield & Maureen Hand; NREL
Map
  • Location of Calwind, Oak Creek; site=2
  • Location of Calwind, Oak Creek near Tehachapi, CA
  • Geographical location of all 11 TCS sites in USA

    Photo
    There is no documents for this section right now...

    Graph
    There is no documents for this section right now...

    Drawing
  • Turbulence Characterization System (TCS) configuration.
  • Phase I schematic layout of system components.
  • Phase II schematic layout of system components.
  • Location map with contours
  • Turbulence Characterization System (TCS) configuration.
  • Phase I schematic layout of system components.
  • Phase II schematic layout of system components.

    report
  • Young Wind Monitor, speed and direction (pdf; 50 kB)
  • Maximum Wind Generator specifications (pdf; 240 kB)
  • NRG Wind Vane specifcations (pdf; 240 kB)
  • Turbulence characterization for wind energy development made by L.Wendell for Battelle & NREL (17.3 MB!)
  • Young Wind Monitor, speed and direction (pdf, 50 kB)
  • Maximum Wind Generator specifications (pdf, 240 kB)
  • NRG Wind Vane specifcations (pdf, 240 kB)
  • turbulence_characterization for wind energy development report (18 MB)

  • MASTS
    1 40 [m] (0,0,0)
    2 30 [m] (0,10,0)

    WIND TURBINES


    PROJECT DESC. : This project was initiated in 1990 to develop measurements and analysis methods that would establish representative and approciate turbulence characteristics needed for the design and siting of costeffective wind turbines. NREL and Batelle had additional objectives that included correlating the nature of the turbulence in the inflow to upwind features, and transferring the technology developed in the project to industry for operational applications. The significant results from this project include the following: 1) Development of a data filtering process which allowed the application of the inexpensive industry standard prospecting anemomenter to be used for appropiate turbulence measurements. 2) Demonstration of the caution required in using the turbulence inensity parameter for wind turbulence applications. 3) Development of an application for the turbulence intensity parameter in site wind power investigations. 4) Discovery of engulfing gusts and fluctuating shear features much stronger at some sites than others. 5) Relation of turbulence characteristics to upwind terrain features. 6) Transfer of design of data acquisition system and software to private industry. 7) Application of data base to provide analysis of extreme turbulence data for IEC turbine design standards. 8) Creation of a CD-ROM turbulence database and users' guide for nine sites representing a variety of wind variability characteristics that can be applied to the development of variable-speed wind turbine control systems.

    MEASUREMENT SYSTEM : 11 different sites with identical equipment (4 cups, 4 vanes and 4 vertical propellors). Measurements from three sensors on the 40-m tower (T1) provided a representation of the vertival shear of the wind velocity for wind turbines with a 20-m rotor diameter and a 30-m rotor diameter. The 30-m tower (T2) allowed a hub-height wind measurement positioned on the perimeter of the rotor disk 10m away from the center of the rotor disc, and in direction perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. This data configuration provided not only vertical and horizontal wind shear data at a site but also data on the effect on rotational sampling of the turbulent wind. The horizontal wind speed and direction were measured at four locations with R.M.Young Wind Monitors. The vertical component of the wind was measured by a single Gill propeller anemometer mounted directly underneath each of the propeller-vane anemometers. A single cup-vane anemometer was mounted near the propeller-vane anemometer aat the top of T2 within a few feet of the propeller-vane anemometer at the same location.This was the Maximum cup and NRG vane that are commonly used in the wind industry to estimate the resource at the site. This instrument was included to provide a general quality assurance check of the other measured data.

    1 site; Hanford, WA
    2 site; Tehachapi, CA
    3 site; Monolith, CA
    4 site; Mojave, CA
    5 site; SanGorgonio, CA
    6 site; Manchester, VT
    7 site; Copenhagen, NY
    8 site; Ainsworth, NE
    9 site; Jericho, TX
    10 site; Holland, MN
    11 site; Rosiere, WI

    ACKNOWLEDMENTS	:	Sandy Butterfield & Maureen Hand; NREL
    INSTITUTION 		:	National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    ADDRESS 	                :	1617 Cole Blvd, Golden, CO
    TEL/FAX 	                :	303-384-6902 / 
    CONTACTS 	        :	Sandy Butterfield / Maureen Hand
    LINKS 	                :	http://www.nrel.org/ / 
    COLLABS 	                :	Batelle, Pacific Northwest Division
    FUND AGENTS            	:	Department of Energy's (DOE) Pacific Laboratory (PNL).
    PERIOD 	                :	0000-00-00 00:00:00 - 0000-00-00 00:00:00
    PUBLICATIONS	: 
    

     


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